In Memoriam

Paul Louis Diamond

10-12-1943 to 8-21-2014

My brother died today after a long illness. He died the way he lived his life, on his own terms. He fought the deterioration of his body with every ounce of his waning strength.

I loved and respected my brother. Though we often butted heads and didn’t see eye to eye on a lot of things, he was my big brother. Growing up he was always protective of me (he was the only one allowed to rag me) but he was always there for me. Now he won’t be!

He was a very strong willed person with strong beliefs, sometimes to the point of pigheadedness. As such, he was sometimes hard to take. But his beliefs came from careful consideration of his interpretation of the facts. And he was an intelligent person, who could make most arguments sound logical.

We were brought up by our parents to be generous and giving. Paul very much adhered to those principles. This is evidenced even in death as he has had his body donated to a medical school to see if they can determine why he lived many years longer than his doctors thought he would. As a lifelong smoker, battling diabetes and obesity, it is somewhat surprising that he is cancer free and survived as long as he did.

My brother was something of a character. My mother taught us the value of a vocabulary and Paul took it to extremes. He would never use a match to light up, but rather an incendiary primer. One of our family stories is about embarrassing my girlfriend (who married me despite this). We were at a picnic and my mother had forgotten the catsup. Linda asked how we could eat hamburgers without catsup. Paul’s reply was you put it in your mouth and you masticate. Linda, being vocabularily challenged mistook the word. I have a lot of stories about his sense of humor and idiosyncrasies that represent fond memories.

Paul never had children of his own, but took a great deal of interest in my daughter and was her favorite uncle. He was great with children and beloved by many young nieces and nephews. He is survived by myself and my daughter and his wife, Colleen. Colleen deserves special mention here as she has been a rock in dealing with Paul’s health issues, moods and taking excellent care of him. I don’t think I can ever adequately express my appreciation for what this has meant to us.

I can’t imagine what Paul has had to go through with the deterioration of his body. I am amazed at how much he has maintained his good humor throughout, though I haven’t been in contact with him on a daily basis. Hopefully, he can now rest from the fight.

I know that there are several people who will miss him as I will. I will remember him for what he was during his life, not what he was during his final battle to hang on to life. For the joie de vivre that he had, for the generosity that he showed, for just being a unique personality. The picture below, of Paul and Colleen, is how I will remember him.

R.I.P my big brother

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Family and friends gathered 8/23 At Paul and Coleen’s home for a balloon send off: Facebook Status

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